curated reading lists

CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE STEM
curated Reading list 

A key quote from Bettina Love about how theory informs our practice with culturally responsive education and culturally relevant education in culturally responsive STEM education and culturally relevant STEM education

This collection of readings will challenge your ideas about STEM, CRE, culture/identities, and reimagination. We recommend you read the following readings in order, from reading #1 to reading #4.

Interested in our breakdown, reactions, and commentary about these readings? Join this list to be notified when we post reading group sessions to our YouTube channel

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Alt text: The two images on this page are screen captures of one page pulled from two different readings.

Reading #1

Sepehyr Vakil and Rick Ayers

The Racial Politics of STEM Education in the USA: Interrogations and Explorations

Get background and context for the state of STEM education as it relates to themes of culturally responsive education. This reading ends with an introduction to  new theories/ideas that can strengthen our own imaginations to do CRSE STEM. 

Reading #3

Beth Warren, Shirin Vossoughi, Ann S. Roseberry, Megan Bang, and Edd V. Taylor

Multiple Ways of Knowing*: Re-Imagining Disciplinary Learning

This book chapter presents ideas about "disentangl[ing] settled disciplinary knowledge and ways of knowing from colonial matrices of power, and to enable insurgent ways of learning, being, and acting in, with, and across disciplines."

This reading may include new vocabulary, concepts, and ideas that you may want assistance with digesting. Be sure to join the list above to be notified of when we post YouTube videos breaking down these articles.

Reading #2

Sophie Wang

Science Under the Scope: Putting Science Into Perspective

This reading is a graphic zine that walks readers through the ways that science is culturally mediated. In other words, this zine addresses the common misconceptions about science (which translates more broadly to STEM) as objective and neutral.

Reading #4

Rochelle Gutiérrez

Living Mathematx: Towards a Vision for the Future

In this article, Dr. Rochelle Gutiérrez presents a new conceptualization of practicing math, which she calls mathematx. This article demonstrates deep questioning, critiquing, and imagining while centering themes associated with culturally responsive education. This is one example of what it looks like to reimagine the very essence and nature of math (and math education) using it a culturally responsive and sustaining lens.

How to Use this Guide:

1. Make Sure You're in the Right Place: Every reading on this list was assembled into a collection with the intention of helping readers expand their depth of knowledge when it comes to culturally responsive and sustaining STEAM. This reading list is not for folks who have not had an introduction to culturally responsive education. This reading is list is for practiced beginners, intermediate practitioners, and advanced practitioners. Practitioners here refers to educators, learners & scholars, DEI consultants, researchers, and education justice advocates.

2. Plan & Schedule Your Reading Time: Each reading will take approximately one hour to two hours to complete. While readings range from 17 to 35 pages, there may be many new concepts and ideas that take time to just sit with, think about, and mull over. Select the best times and days for you to dedicate time to reading. Make sure your download readings to accessible locations if you plan to read on the go, during commutes, whenever you get free time, etc.

3. Highlight, annotate, and take Notes: This is the kind of reading list that you're going to want to return to over and over again. Each time you read an article, you might pull away new information especially since learning and practicing culturally responsive education is such an iterative process. Engaging in active will help you translate these ideas into practice later.

4. Talk About What You're Reading: Sometimes discussing new concepts and ideas can solidify your own thinking about them. Find folks to chat with about what you're reading. Don't know anyone you can talk to? Chat with us! Follow us on our social media platforms. You can tweet us, leave comments on posts, or DM. You can also check out the discussions that we will be posting on YouTube in the future.